Activision survey says ESRB is doing okay

ESRBThe Entertainment Software Ratings Board has been under fire lately. Even here at QJ, we just couldn’t ignore ESRB-related news bits that concern everybody in the industry. Recently, the board announced the various steps it is taking to keep up with the young videogamers of today. Despite these efforts however, some are still finding ways to replace them.

ESRB might have just found an unlikely ally in Activision as the latter released the results of its newly conducted online survey. The study, titled “Ratings Are Not a Game,” proved that 80% of the parents find the ESRB system effective and are actually following them.

Activision Executive VP Robin Kaminsky announced that they are very delighted with the survey results. “But it was even more gratifying to see that such a large majority of parents are aware of, researching and active in their children’s videogame purchasing and playing,” Kaminsky added. ESRB on the other hand, just couldn’t help but be happy. According to its president Patricia Vance:

Video game ratings can only be effective if consumers understand the ratings and use them when making purchasing decisions for their families, and this study shows that parents greatly rely on and value the ESRB ratings in helping them decide which games to allow their children to play.

A total number of 1,014 players, ranging anywhere between 8 to 24 years old, together with their parents were used in the study. The breakdown of the results are as follows:

  • 84% of parents cited an awareness with the ESRB system
  • 65% of children cited an awareness with the ESRB system
  • 79% of parents said they paid close attention to games their children play
  • 68% of the parents believed the ESRB system is effective
  • 56% of the parents said that rating was the top influence in determining whether to buy a game
  • 52% of parents said they actively researched games before buying them
  • 74% of parents said that video gaming was part of their family
  • 52% of parents said they play games themselves

Via GamaSutra

ESRBThe Entertainment Software Ratings Board has been under fire lately. Even here at QJ, we just couldn’t ignore ESRB-related news bits that concern everybody in the industry. Recently, the board announced the various steps it is taking to keep up with the young videogamers of today. Despite these efforts however, some are still finding ways to replace them.

ESRB might have just found an unlikely ally in Activision as the latter released the results of its newly conducted online survey. The study, titled “Ratings Are Not a Game,” proved that 80% of the parents find the ESRB system effective and are actually following them.

Activision Executive VP Robin Kaminsky announced that they are very delighted with the survey results. “But it was even more gratifying to see that such a large majority of parents are aware of, researching and active in their children’s videogame purchasing and playing,” Kaminsky added. ESRB on the other hand, just couldn’t help but be happy. According to its president Patricia Vance:

Video game ratings can only be effective if consumers understand the ratings and use them when making purchasing decisions for their families, and this study shows that parents greatly rely on and value the ESRB ratings in helping them decide which games to allow their children to play.

A total number of 1,014 players, ranging anywhere between 8 to 24 years old, together with their parents were used in the study. The breakdown of the results are as follows:

  • 84% of parents cited an awareness with the ESRB system
  • 65% of children cited an awareness with the ESRB system
  • 79% of parents said they paid close attention to games their children play
  • 68% of the parents believed the ESRB system is effective
  • 56% of the parents said that rating was the top influence in determining whether to buy a game
  • 52% of parents said they actively researched games before buying them
  • 74% of parents said that video gaming was part of their family
  • 52% of parents said they play games themselves

Via GamaSutra

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