EA focusing on original IP but will keep licenses

Electronic ArtsFans of Electronic Arts titles don’t need to worry. The company may be shifting its focus towards developing original intellectual properties (IPs), but that doesn’t mean they’re dropping their old cash-cow licenses. According to Glenn Entis, senior VP and chief visual officer at EA, the company will continue to develop licensed products despite a new focus on original IP.

In an interview with GamesIndustry.biz, Entis said, “Just to be clear, we’re not moving away from the old business model. The licensed properties we build, we love those titles, we have great relationships with the license holders. What we’re saying is we also need to aggressively supplement that with original titles.”

Entis admitted that a few years ago, EA was reluctant to take risks on a game if they weren’t sure if the outcome. Now, though, he says, “We’re more willing right now to bet on really talented developers and say, ‘Okay, this is new and we can see there are real risks, but we believe in the people their passion about it.’

“One thing we’ve realised as a company is that game developers are happier, more inspired, and seem to be drawing in more talent when we’re doing the exciting, creative work. It’s simple – people want to be proud of the work they do.”

While Entis points out that EA is not moving away from the company’s old business model, perhaps this shift towards original IPs can revitalize some of their franchises that have been hit with a lot of criticisms lately.

Via Games Industry

Electronic ArtsFans of Electronic Arts titles don’t need to worry. The company may be shifting its focus towards developing original intellectual properties (IPs), but that doesn’t mean they’re dropping their old cash-cow licenses. According to Glenn Entis, senior VP and chief visual officer at EA, the company will continue to develop licensed products despite a new focus on original IP.

In an interview with GamesIndustry.biz, Entis said, “Just to be clear, we’re not moving away from the old business model. The licensed properties we build, we love those titles, we have great relationships with the license holders. What we’re saying is we also need to aggressively supplement that with original titles.”

Entis admitted that a few years ago, EA was reluctant to take risks on a game if they weren’t sure if the outcome. Now, though, he says, “We’re more willing right now to bet on really talented developers and say, ‘Okay, this is new and we can see there are real risks, but we believe in the people their passion about it.’

“One thing we’ve realised as a company is that game developers are happier, more inspired, and seem to be drawing in more talent when we’re doing the exciting, creative work. It’s simple – people want to be proud of the work they do.”

While Entis points out that EA is not moving away from the company’s old business model, perhaps this shift towards original IPs can revitalize some of their franchises that have been hit with a lot of criticisms lately.

Via Games Industry

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