Elite-v-Classic Llama hard numbers: a little more quiet, a little less power, just as hot

How much is my power bill in the 360? Ruff-ruff! - Image 1 How much is my power bill in the 360? Ruff-ruff! - Image 2 

So what’s the difference between the Elite and the Classic Xbox 360? Besides the color, the HDMI and the hard drive, of course. Llama.com dissected the Elite in order to discover the answer, and now they put it through side-by-side performance tests to get hard numbers.

Those same hard numbers reconfirm their suspicions that it ain’t the 65nm chip in the Elite – although by now that point is moot: industry sources reporting that the Xbox 360 will receive its 65nm chips later this Fall.

Llama’s results show that the Xbox 360 Elite on average uses slightly less power than the classic, particularly when watching DVD movies. Results slightly differed between Original 360s using BENQ drives and those using Hitachi drives vs. the Elite’s Hitachi drive. The “slightly less” number is not significant enough, Llama notes, to justify the presence of a power-saving 65nm chip (or any tech with the same power-saving ends) in the Elite.

Measuring the noise output of the Elite, Llama found the newer console to be again, slightly lower than both Hitachi and BENQ drive Classic 360s, by a couple of decibels here and there. And then there was heat: no change whatsoever, all test units expelling 128 degrees F (ambient room temperature  = 73 deg. F) of pure, keep-my-360-from-melting exhaust air.

Nearly the same results: probably the same chip tech. Then again, the 65nm 360 seems still set for a Fall debut.

How much is my power bill in the 360? Ruff-ruff! - Image 1 How much is my power bill in the 360? Ruff-ruff! - Image 2 

So what’s the difference between the Elite and the Classic Xbox 360? Besides the color, the HDMI and the hard drive, of course. Llama.com dissected the Elite in order to discover the answer, and now they put it through side-by-side performance tests to get hard numbers.

Those same hard numbers reconfirm their suspicions that it ain’t the 65nm chip in the Elite – although by now that point is moot: industry sources reporting that the Xbox 360 will receive its 65nm chips later this Fall.

Llama’s results show that the Xbox 360 Elite on average uses slightly less power than the classic, particularly when watching DVD movies. Results slightly differed between Original 360s using BENQ drives and those using Hitachi drives vs. the Elite’s Hitachi drive. The “slightly less” number is not significant enough, Llama notes, to justify the presence of a power-saving 65nm chip (or any tech with the same power-saving ends) in the Elite.

Measuring the noise output of the Elite, Llama found the newer console to be again, slightly lower than both Hitachi and BENQ drive Classic 360s, by a couple of decibels here and there. And then there was heat: no change whatsoever, all test units expelling 128 degrees F (ambient room temperature  = 73 deg. F) of pure, keep-my-360-from-melting exhaust air.

Nearly the same results: probably the same chip tech. Then again, the 65nm 360 seems still set for a Fall debut.

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