Future doctors: My SIXAXIS please…

Virtual medical trainingThe first ever PlayStation appeared in the mid 1990s. It is logical to say that gamers of that generation could be members of the working class already, professionals so to speak. Let us say, one gamer chose to be a doctor. Now, it is rather weird but his hands feel more at home with a controller than a scalpel.

To solve this problem, MedCom together with several health institutions in U.K. developed two training system packages that very well uses PlayStation technology. The objective for creating the device is to help newly-qualified doctors learn basic skills and surgical procedures. Initial use of the tool showed more than 50% increase in knowledge and skills among trainee surgeons.

The Royal College of Surgeons likewise, approves and recommends the new systems as part of the foundation training programme undertaken by trainee doctors in the first two years following medical school. The first system demonstrates and simulates easy medical procedures (i.e. lumbar punctures) while the second, shows techniques ranging from removing a toenail to drilling into a skull.

Sixaxis“These packages will help to ensure that the ‘PlayStation’ generation of doctors and surgeons are as confident with their instruments as they are with their consoles, improving care and treatment for patients,” shares MedCom’s Warren Hobden. Professor of Surgery Steve Leveson at Hull and York Medical School seconded, “it is therefore important that every trainee has the opportunity to enhance their expertise in fundamental surgical procedures and fine-tune their skills in a safe virtual environment.”

So five to ten years from now, don’t be surprised if your dentist uses a SIXAXIS to extract your aching tooth…

Via BBC

Virtual medical trainingThe first ever PlayStation appeared in the mid 1990s. It is logical to say that gamers of that generation could be members of the working class already, professionals so to speak. Let us say, one gamer chose to be a doctor. Now, it is rather weird but his hands feel more at home with a controller than a scalpel.

To solve this problem, MedCom together with several health institutions in U.K. developed two training system packages that very well uses PlayStation technology. The objective for creating the device is to help newly-qualified doctors learn basic skills and surgical procedures. Initial use of the tool showed more than 50% increase in knowledge and skills among trainee surgeons.

The Royal College of Surgeons likewise, approves and recommends the new systems as part of the foundation training programme undertaken by trainee doctors in the first two years following medical school. The first system demonstrates and simulates easy medical procedures (i.e. lumbar punctures) while the second, shows techniques ranging from removing a toenail to drilling into a skull.

Sixaxis“These packages will help to ensure that the ‘PlayStation’ generation of doctors and surgeons are as confident with their instruments as they are with their consoles, improving care and treatment for patients,” shares MedCom’s Warren Hobden. Professor of Surgery Steve Leveson at Hull and York Medical School seconded, “it is therefore important that every trainee has the opportunity to enhance their expertise in fundamental surgical procedures and fine-tune their skills in a safe virtual environment.”

So five to ten years from now, don’t be surprised if your dentist uses a SIXAXIS to extract your aching tooth…

Via BBC

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published.