How China controls the MMORPG market

 Starting in June, the Chinese government will require MMORPG makers to demand players’ IDs and real names, a rule that a lot of Chinese players don’t follow at the moment – a move that supposedly “stops teenagers from playing too much”.

This action is a follow-up to last year’s attempt to control the MMO market with a set maximum of online play hours.


On a related note, China is also banning “unpatriotic” games, supporting “patriotic” ones instead which feature national heroes such as Lei Feng.


Questionable moves of a country that as of today hosts over 100 million internet users, with around 20 million being avid MMO players.


 Starting in June, the Chinese government will require MMORPG makers to demand players’ IDs and real names, a rule that a lot of Chinese players don’t follow at the moment – a move that supposedly “stops teenagers from playing too much”.

This action is a follow-up to last year’s attempt to control the MMO market with a set maximum of online play hours.


On a related note, China is also banning “unpatriotic” games, supporting “patriotic” ones instead which feature national heroes such as Lei Feng.


Questionable moves of a country that as of today hosts over 100 million internet users, with around 20 million being avid MMO players.

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