MP3 transmitters declared legal in the U.K.

iTrip

If you think that North Americans are the only ones basking on their newly declared rights, the Brits are also treading the same happy road. Due to insistent public demand, UK‘s Office of Communications or Ofcom is legalizing the use of FM transmitters that allow mp3 players and iPods to play through car radios.

The use of accessories like Griffin’s iTrip was banned in the United Kingdom as their transmissions can interfere with the broadcasts of legal radio stations. We have already mentioned in our earlier report that the ban was based on the Wireless Telegraph Act of 1949 which basically forbids the use of radio equipment without a license. In spite of the ban, these accessories have been widely available online.

Starting December 8, Brits could legally use certain FM transmitters, which can be tuned to spare frequencies. But many devices on the market will still be illegal, as they didn’t meet the required technical specifications and could interfere with radio broadcasts. All approved devices will carry a CE mark which implies the approval for sale in the European Union. Ofcom will also lift the need for a license to use Citizens’ Band radio.

Via BBC

iTrip

If you think that North Americans are the only ones basking on their newly declared rights, the Brits are also treading the same happy road. Due to insistent public demand, UK‘s Office of Communications or Ofcom is legalizing the use of FM transmitters that allow mp3 players and iPods to play through car radios.

The use of accessories like Griffin’s iTrip was banned in the United Kingdom as their transmissions can interfere with the broadcasts of legal radio stations. We have already mentioned in our earlier report that the ban was based on the Wireless Telegraph Act of 1949 which basically forbids the use of radio equipment without a license. In spite of the ban, these accessories have been widely available online.

Starting December 8, Brits could legally use certain FM transmitters, which can be tuned to spare frequencies. But many devices on the market will still be illegal, as they didn’t meet the required technical specifications and could interfere with radio broadcasts. All approved devices will carry a CE mark which implies the approval for sale in the European Union. Ofcom will also lift the need for a license to use Citizens’ Band radio.

Via BBC

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