Pictures of the Eclipse

A total solar eclipse is very rare because all parts of this puzzle must line up correctly in order for it to occur. The moon must be in its new phase for a solar eclipse to take place. The moon’s shadow has two parts—a central region called the umbra and an outer region called the penumbra. The part of the moonÂ’s shadow which passes over you determines what kind of eclipse you will see.

The eclipse that occurred yesterday lasting over 4 minutes which is quite long compared to the average minute or two eclipse’s previously seen. The next solar eclipse will be seen from northern Canada, Greenland, Siberia, Mongolia and northern China on August 1 2008 lasting 2 minutes.

Pictures of the Eclipse

Image above: The sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, is visible during totality — when the sun is totally obscured by the moon’s shadow. Credit: NASA TV

 

Pictures of the Eclipse
Image above: The sun creates a “diamond ring” effect as it emerges after totality. Right: Solar flares, or “prominences” are visible at the edge of the moon’s shadow. Credit: NASA TV
 

Pictures of the Eclipse

Image above: The moon’s shadow falls on Earth, as seen from the International Space Station 230 miles above. Expedition 13, the next space station crew, launches from Kazakhstan tonight

(+ Space Station Section). Photo Credit: NASA.

A total solar eclipse is very rare because all parts of this puzzle must line up correctly in order for it to occur. The moon must be in its new phase for a solar eclipse to take place. The moon’s shadow has two parts—a central region called the umbra and an outer region called the penumbra. The part of the moonÂ’s shadow which passes over you determines what kind of eclipse you will see.

The eclipse that occurred yesterday lasting over 4 minutes which is quite long compared to the average minute or two eclipse’s previously seen. The next solar eclipse will be seen from northern Canada, Greenland, Siberia, Mongolia and northern China on August 1 2008 lasting 2 minutes.

Pictures of the Eclipse

Image above: The sun’s corona, or outer atmosphere, is visible during totality — when the sun is totally obscured by the moon’s shadow. Credit: NASA TV

 

Pictures of the Eclipse
Image above: The sun creates a “diamond ring” effect as it emerges after totality. Right: Solar flares, or “prominences” are visible at the edge of the moon’s shadow. Credit: NASA TV
 

Pictures of the Eclipse

Image above: The moon’s shadow falls on Earth, as seen from the International Space Station 230 miles above. Expedition 13, the next space station crew, launches from Kazakhstan tonight

(+ Space Station Section). Photo Credit: NASA.

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