Revolution Controller: Touch It

Controllerapplet

Check out the Controller play applet at IGN [here].

In a videogame industry focused on the latest and greatest graphics, Nintendo’s new console is something of an enigma. Revolution represents a bold new direction for the company. The device does not have the horsepower of competing platforms. Rather, the Big N has focused its energy and resources on creating a unique new input mechanic — a controller — that could very well change the way people play games. It is the Revolution’s controller and not the console that is the most important ingredient to Nintendo’s next-generation success. And that is an industry first.

The Revolution’s officially nicknamed “free-hand style” controller has been designed to look like a stylish television remote so that it is immediately attractive to non-gamers. The Big N hopes that people normally put off by conventional videogame controllers will in contrast find the Revolution’s pointer unthreatening and intuitive.

The peripheral communicates wirelessly using Bluetooth technology with a motion sensor bar placed on or near a television to provide gamers with full control freedom within a virtual 3D box. The controller interprets movements in the X, Y and Z axes, which means that it reads and translates horizontal and vertical motion, as well as depth. It, in essence, becomes an extension of the player, reading their movements and applying them to any given game situation. For example, thrusting the controller forward might cause legendary hero Link to do the same with his sword in a new Revolution Zelda title. Or, the peripheral could stand in for a mouse on a computer, effectively providing unparalleled precision aiming in a first-person shooter. The applications are practically limitless.

In a videogame industry focused on the latest and greatest graphics, Nintendo’s new console is something of an enigma. Revolution represents a bold new direction for the company. The device does not have the horsepower of competing platforms. Rather, the Big N has focused its energy and resources on creating a unique new input mechanic — a controller — that could very well change the way people play games. It is the Revolution’s controller and not the console that is the most important ingredient to Nintendo’s next-generation success. And that is an industry first.

The Revolution’s officially nicknamed “free-hand style” controller has been designed to look like a stylish television remote so that it is immediately attractive to non-gamers. The Big N hopes that people normally put off by conventional videogame controllers will in contrast find the Revolution’s pointer unthreatening and intuitive.

The peripheral communicates wirelessly using Bluetooth technology with a motion sensor bar placed on or near a television to provide gamers with full control freedom within a virtual 3D box. The controller interprets movements in the X, Y and Z axes, which means that it reads and translates horizontal and vertical motion, as well as depth. It, in essence, becomes an extension of the player, reading their movements and applying them to any given game situation. For example, thrusting the controller forward might cause legendary hero Link to do the same with his sword in a new Revolution Zelda title. Or, the peripheral could stand in for a mouse on a computer, effectively providing unparalleled precision aiming in a first-person shooter. The applications are practically limitless.

Controllerapplet

Check out the Controller play applet at IGN [here].

In a videogame industry focused on the latest and greatest graphics, Nintendo’s new console is something of an enigma. Revolution represents a bold new direction for the company. The device does not have the horsepower of competing platforms. Rather, the Big N has focused its energy and resources on creating a unique new input mechanic — a controller — that could very well change the way people play games. It is the Revolution’s controller and not the console that is the most important ingredient to Nintendo’s next-generation success. And that is an industry first.

The Revolution’s officially nicknamed “free-hand style” controller has been designed to look like a stylish television remote so that it is immediately attractive to non-gamers. The Big N hopes that people normally put off by conventional videogame controllers will in contrast find the Revolution’s pointer unthreatening and intuitive.

The peripheral communicates wirelessly using Bluetooth technology with a motion sensor bar placed on or near a television to provide gamers with full control freedom within a virtual 3D box. The controller interprets movements in the X, Y and Z axes, which means that it reads and translates horizontal and vertical motion, as well as depth. It, in essence, becomes an extension of the player, reading their movements and applying them to any given game situation. For example, thrusting the controller forward might cause legendary hero Link to do the same with his sword in a new Revolution Zelda title. Or, the peripheral could stand in for a mouse on a computer, effectively providing unparalleled precision aiming in a first-person shooter. The applications are practically limitless.

In a videogame industry focused on the latest and greatest graphics, Nintendo’s new console is something of an enigma. Revolution represents a bold new direction for the company. The device does not have the horsepower of competing platforms. Rather, the Big N has focused its energy and resources on creating a unique new input mechanic — a controller — that could very well change the way people play games. It is the Revolution’s controller and not the console that is the most important ingredient to Nintendo’s next-generation success. And that is an industry first.

The Revolution’s officially nicknamed “free-hand style” controller has been designed to look like a stylish television remote so that it is immediately attractive to non-gamers. The Big N hopes that people normally put off by conventional videogame controllers will in contrast find the Revolution’s pointer unthreatening and intuitive.

The peripheral communicates wirelessly using Bluetooth technology with a motion sensor bar placed on or near a television to provide gamers with full control freedom within a virtual 3D box. The controller interprets movements in the X, Y and Z axes, which means that it reads and translates horizontal and vertical motion, as well as depth. It, in essence, becomes an extension of the player, reading their movements and applying them to any given game situation. For example, thrusting the controller forward might cause legendary hero Link to do the same with his sword in a new Revolution Zelda title. Or, the peripheral could stand in for a mouse on a computer, effectively providing unparalleled precision aiming in a first-person shooter. The applications are practically limitless.

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