Some SL residents raise brows at New York Times

NYTWhen it comes to balance and honest news reporting, we have no doubts regarding the work ethics of several companies like Reuters among many others. As everybody knows, the news agency recently joined the growing ranks of real life companies entering Second Life’s virtual world. They have to keep in mind though that ’round here, the rules are a bit different.

We haven’t had the chance to check on Reuters’ virtual work yet, but residents are on to The New York Times. While the newspaper is not yet in Second Life, it published a story about Linden Lab‘s MMO creation. The article did a good job of covering the bases and it focused on commerce. But one sentence reads, “Catherine A. Fitzpatrick, 50, a member of Second Life who in the real world is a Russian translator in Manhattan is a figure well-known to other participants called Prokofy Neva, who runs a business renting real estate to other players.”

A good number of residents do not quite approve of the above mention of Prokofy Neva’s real life. As they put it, it defeats the very reason and purpose of virtual freedom. They also believe that NY Times thinks having a nom de virtual is a form of aberration. While we here at QJ thinks that the newspaper do not have any ill intentions whatsoever, we suggest just the same that they observe the norms, rules and the culture of a virtual world.

Via NYTimes

NYTWhen it comes to balance and honest news reporting, we have no doubts regarding the work ethics of several companies like Reuters among many others. As everybody knows, the news agency recently joined the growing ranks of real life companies entering Second Life’s virtual world. They have to keep in mind though that ’round here, the rules are a bit different.

We haven’t had the chance to check on Reuters’ virtual work yet, but residents are on to The New York Times. While the newspaper is not yet in Second Life, it published a story about Linden Lab‘s MMO creation. The article did a good job of covering the bases and it focused on commerce. But one sentence reads, “Catherine A. Fitzpatrick, 50, a member of Second Life who in the real world is a Russian translator in Manhattan is a figure well-known to other participants called Prokofy Neva, who runs a business renting real estate to other players.”

A good number of residents do not quite approve of the above mention of Prokofy Neva’s real life. As they put it, it defeats the very reason and purpose of virtual freedom. They also believe that NY Times thinks having a nom de virtual is a form of aberration. While we here at QJ thinks that the newspaper do not have any ill intentions whatsoever, we suggest just the same that they observe the norms, rules and the culture of a virtual world.

Via NYTimes

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