Videogames won over Illinois’ SEVGL in court

VideogameOver the past few days, we followed the development of GTA ads which earned the ire of some people who are urging that the ads be pulled down from public places. First there was Boston and Denver. While things are still being protested in those areas, Oregon‘s TriMet went out of its way and removed the ads.

Now for a change, instead of listing down all states that don’t like such kind of games, let’s start a new one: states that fell on their knees to such kind of games. Let us begin with Illinois:

Last year, August of 2005 to be exact, the above mentioned state enacted the Sexually Explicit Video Game Law or SEVGL. Accordingly, the objective of the law is to criminalize the sale of “sexually explicit” video games to minors. Also, the law states that those who are in the business should conspicuously label any sexually explicit game with a four square inch label reading “18.” On the other hand, Entertainment Software Association together with other similar groups protested the law immediately the following day.

One year after, the case finally reaches to a conclusion: “The district court permanently enjoined enforcement of the law, and the State of Illinois sought review. On appeal, the Seventh Circuit affirmed the lower court’s holding that the statue was not narrowly tailored.” Why didn’t we heard cheering? Hmm.. Well, in simpler terms, the law was unjustified and without basis.

Now we hear the loud applause…

Via InternetCases

VideogameOver the past few days, we followed the development of GTA ads which earned the ire of some people who are urging that the ads be pulled down from public places. First there was Boston and Denver. While things are still being protested in those areas, Oregon‘s TriMet went out of its way and removed the ads.

Now for a change, instead of listing down all states that don’t like such kind of games, let’s start a new one: states that fell on their knees to such kind of games. Let us begin with Illinois:

Last year, August of 2005 to be exact, the above mentioned state enacted the Sexually Explicit Video Game Law or SEVGL. Accordingly, the objective of the law is to criminalize the sale of “sexually explicit” video games to minors. Also, the law states that those who are in the business should conspicuously label any sexually explicit game with a four square inch label reading “18.” On the other hand, Entertainment Software Association together with other similar groups protested the law immediately the following day.

One year after, the case finally reaches to a conclusion: “The district court permanently enjoined enforcement of the law, and the State of Illinois sought review. On appeal, the Seventh Circuit affirmed the lower court’s holding that the statue was not narrowly tailored.” Why didn’t we heard cheering? Hmm.. Well, in simpler terms, the law was unjustified and without basis.

Now we hear the loud applause…

Via InternetCases

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