AP interviews Fils-Aime: Wii for the masses

Reggie RevolutionUnnecessary roughness? For some reason the questions from the Associated Press kept bringing up Sony. So Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, also kept tackling Sony. And we’re not saying he tackled Sony gently. No, there were some instances when Nintendo might have gotten a 15-yard penalty for unnecessary roughness.

AP asks how Nintendo will compete with the PS3. Reggie says this:

I don’t think the question is so much how we are going to compete with them, as how are they going to compete with our strategy: our strategy of going to the mass audience; our strategy of having a fantastic price point right from the start; our strategy of including a great pack-in game called “Wii Sports;” our strategy of having a wide range of support from all of our licensees.

Oh, Reggie you silly, you’re flamebaiting, hehe. Then AP asks why Nintendo has a lot more units available than Sony. Reggie says this:

I guess the question is why “Why do they [Sony] have so few?” We have properly executed our manufacturing and distribution system.

Reggie also goes on to name some big numbers you already know (4 million units worldwide by December 31, 6 million by March 31) – and he still says they’ll run out of stock.

Why the Wii is so affordable. “We wanted a mass-market price, and we believe the market will validate those decisions.” You know the answer: not including a DVD player “at the start” or high-definition capability “at the start.”

What’s this “at the start” stuff? Will Nintendo release add-ons that allow DVD playback and high-definition capability? That’d be neat. After all, there’s already talk of a DVD-capable Wii for Japan and some parts of Europe. What’s to stop Nintendo from releasing an external DVD player? Then an external processor pack with graphics-dedicated chipsets?

About the launch. Why is the U.S. launch earlier than the Japanese launch (the reverse of Sony’s plan)? Reggie explains: the US end-of-year shopping extravaganza starts earlier (with Thanksgiving). Japan doesn’t really pick up until early December, and “obviously we made the strategic decision to launch in Europe this year, and that’s very important to us.”

Reggie RevolutionUnnecessary roughness? For some reason the questions from the Associated Press kept bringing up Sony. So Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America, also kept tackling Sony. And we’re not saying he tackled Sony gently. No, there were some instances when Nintendo might have gotten a 15-yard penalty for unnecessary roughness.

AP asks how Nintendo will compete with the PS3. Reggie says this:

I don’t think the question is so much how we are going to compete with them, as how are they going to compete with our strategy: our strategy of going to the mass audience; our strategy of having a fantastic price point right from the start; our strategy of including a great pack-in game called “Wii Sports;” our strategy of having a wide range of support from all of our licensees.

Oh, Reggie you silly, you’re flamebaiting, hehe. Then AP asks why Nintendo has a lot more units available than Sony. Reggie says this:

I guess the question is why “Why do they [Sony] have so few?” We have properly executed our manufacturing and distribution system.

Reggie also goes on to name some big numbers you already know (4 million units worldwide by December 31, 6 million by March 31) – and he still says they’ll run out of stock.

Why the Wii is so affordable. “We wanted a mass-market price, and we believe the market will validate those decisions.” You know the answer: not including a DVD player “at the start” or high-definition capability “at the start.”

What’s this “at the start” stuff? Will Nintendo release add-ons that allow DVD playback and high-definition capability? That’d be neat. After all, there’s already talk of a DVD-capable Wii for Japan and some parts of Europe. What’s to stop Nintendo from releasing an external DVD player? Then an external processor pack with graphics-dedicated chipsets?

About the launch. Why is the U.S. launch earlier than the Japanese launch (the reverse of Sony’s plan)? Reggie explains: the US end-of-year shopping extravaganza starts earlier (with Thanksgiving). Japan doesn’t really pick up until early December, and “obviously we made the strategic decision to launch in Europe this year, and that’s very important to us.”

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