Inside Metal Gear Acid 2 for the PSP

Mga2

Shinta Nojiri, director of Konami PSP title Metal Gear Acid 2 tells Next Generation about his forthcoming project and those 3D goggles attachmentÂ…

Next Generation: What lessons have you learned about bringing this franchise to a handheld platform since the launch of Metal Gear Acid?

Shinta Nojiri: In truth, the only games IÂ’ve worked on have been handheld games. So working with a handheld console like PSP is quite familiar for me. However, IÂ’m still learning the craft of directing a game project. I feel IÂ’m getting better and better at managing time and personnel.
 
As for Metal Gear Acid 2, I think I’ve made the game that I set out to make – nothing is lying on the cutting room floor. MGA2 is a huge step from the first one.
 
How about the look of the game? How has that changed since the first game?

For somebody who hasnÂ’t played the first Metal Gear Acid, this might sound a bit strange, but the series is all about using cards to complete a Metal Gear mission. When cards are used, they produce a flashy, cool-looking effect. With MGA2, we set out to make those effects even cooler.
 
I tried to put myself in the shoes of the gamer. WouldnÂ’t it be addictive if each new card I collected would produce a unique effect? WouldnÂ’t that make me want to collect more and more cards?
 
To compliment the improved special effects is a new graphic style that resembles the colorful art style of American comic books. Instead of continuing with the dark art design of the first Acid, weÂ’ve really gone out of our way to make a new graphic style that fits in with the game world.
 
And while this has nothing to do with the question, IÂ’m particularly excited about the story of MGA2. Fans wondering why Acid  games are card-based may be surprised to find out that we explain why in the story of MGA2.

Read the full interview [here].

Mga2

Shinta Nojiri, director of Konami PSP title Metal Gear Acid 2 tells Next Generation about his forthcoming project and those 3D goggles attachmentÂ…

Next Generation: What lessons have you learned about bringing this franchise to a handheld platform since the launch of Metal Gear Acid?

Shinta Nojiri: In truth, the only games IÂ’ve worked on have been handheld games. So working with a handheld console like PSP is quite familiar for me. However, IÂ’m still learning the craft of directing a game project. I feel IÂ’m getting better and better at managing time and personnel.
 
As for Metal Gear Acid 2, I think I’ve made the game that I set out to make – nothing is lying on the cutting room floor. MGA2 is a huge step from the first one.
 
How about the look of the game? How has that changed since the first game?

For somebody who hasnÂ’t played the first Metal Gear Acid, this might sound a bit strange, but the series is all about using cards to complete a Metal Gear mission. When cards are used, they produce a flashy, cool-looking effect. With MGA2, we set out to make those effects even cooler.
 
I tried to put myself in the shoes of the gamer. WouldnÂ’t it be addictive if each new card I collected would produce a unique effect? WouldnÂ’t that make me want to collect more and more cards?
 
To compliment the improved special effects is a new graphic style that resembles the colorful art style of American comic books. Instead of continuing with the dark art design of the first Acid, weÂ’ve really gone out of our way to make a new graphic style that fits in with the game world.
 
And while this has nothing to do with the question, IÂ’m particularly excited about the story of MGA2. Fans wondering why Acid  games are card-based may be surprised to find out that we explain why in the story of MGA2.

Read the full interview [here].

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