More on in-game advertising

The future of advertising?

GameDaily points out that tucked behind Battlefield 2142‘s manual is a white card that says that the users IP address and “other anonymous data” would be sent to a company called IGA Worldwide in order to deliver in-game advertisements. The disclaimer then says that users should not install or play the game on a system that’s connected to the Internet if users aren’t comfortable with having their information transmitted and collected by the IGA.

This isn’t anything new. And since word of it got out, rumors spread, and people started claiming that Battlefield was forcing spyware into people’s computers. Of course it was later confirmed that all that was being sent was IP addresses, geographical regions, info on what advertising the player has been exposed to already, and how big the ad was.

The situation of course raised online debate about whether or not in-game advertising is acceptable. Some argued that it’s just the same as having to put up with movie trailers in DVDs, some said that it ruins the gaming experience. Some say that they’re alright with it as long as the ads “fit” in the game world; contemporary ads (say a Coke billboard) for contemporary games (in GTA). Some say they don’t really mind, and if given a choice between a game having to be more expensive and ad-free or having the game sport a few promos in it but have a lower tag, they’d choose the latter.

Steven Wong of GameDaily pointed something out that made sense. He says:

The biggest problems arise when the advertising takes priority over the game, so players end up spending money on long commercials. Sure, one could buy Burger King-themed games for kids for $4, but I can’t imagine too many people who would be willing to spend $50 on something like that.

We guess it’s all well and good to have in-game ads as long as it doesn’t cross a certain line thematically (no modern ads in a fantasy game please!) and ethically (do not collect more than IP info), and the game still stays a game, not an interactive billboard with a patched on story.

Via GameDaily

The future of advertising?

GameDaily points out that tucked behind Battlefield 2142‘s manual is a white card that says that the users IP address and “other anonymous data” would be sent to a company called IGA Worldwide in order to deliver in-game advertisements. The disclaimer then says that users should not install or play the game on a system that’s connected to the Internet if users aren’t comfortable with having their information transmitted and collected by the IGA.

This isn’t anything new. And since word of it got out, rumors spread, and people started claiming that Battlefield was forcing spyware into people’s computers. Of course it was later confirmed that all that was being sent was IP addresses, geographical regions, info on what advertising the player has been exposed to already, and how big the ad was.

The situation of course raised online debate about whether or not in-game advertising is acceptable. Some argued that it’s just the same as having to put up with movie trailers in DVDs, some said that it ruins the gaming experience. Some say that they’re alright with it as long as the ads “fit” in the game world; contemporary ads (say a Coke billboard) for contemporary games (in GTA). Some say they don’t really mind, and if given a choice between a game having to be more expensive and ad-free or having the game sport a few promos in it but have a lower tag, they’d choose the latter.

Steven Wong of GameDaily pointed something out that made sense. He says:

The biggest problems arise when the advertising takes priority over the game, so players end up spending money on long commercials. Sure, one could buy Burger King-themed games for kids for $4, but I can’t imagine too many people who would be willing to spend $50 on something like that.

We guess it’s all well and good to have in-game ads as long as it doesn’t cross a certain line thematically (no modern ads in a fantasy game please!) and ethically (do not collect more than IP info), and the game still stays a game, not an interactive billboard with a patched on story.

Via GameDaily

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