Simulation Shows Galaxy Evolved 300 Million Years After Big Bang

Two astronomers have conducted one of the largest astrophysics simulations to date using the “Earth Simulator” supercomputer in Japan. The simulation of Masao Mori of the University of California at Los Angeles and Masayuki Umemura at the University of Tsukuba is showing that galaxies evolved just 300 million years after the Big bang to the present day and galaactic development may have evolved much faster than currently accepted values.  “Our finding shows that galaxy formation proceeded much faster and that a large amount of heavy elements were produced in galaxies in just 1 billion years,” says Mori.
Two astronomers have conducted one of the largest astrophysics simulations to date using the “Earth Simulator” supercomputer in Japan. The simulation of Masao Mori of the University of California at Los Angeles and Masayuki Umemura at the University of Tsukuba is showing that galaxies evolved just 300 million years after the Big bang to the present day and galaactic development may have evolved much faster than currently accepted values.  “Our finding shows that galaxy formation proceeded much faster and that a large amount of heavy elements were produced in galaxies in just 1 billion years,” says Mori.

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