DNS issues plaguing the Wii?

Ninty's WiFi ConnectionHere’s a question for all you lucky people out there who already have Wiis in your hands. Have you ever encountered DNS problems when trying to connect to the Wii store?

See, some guys from Ars Technica ran into a wall when they tried to do just that. They couldn’t view the EULA that’s necessary before you can buy virtual console games, and every time they tried, they just got an error 220602 message.

After calling the Nintendo help desk and getting told to a) change the WiFi router to channel 1 or 11, and b) move the Wii closer to the router (these methods didn’t work for them, but apparently it worked for some people), they finally traced the problem to a crappy DNS server.

Now, there are a lot of possible causes for the DNS propagation issues, and a lot of people have pointed out that Nintendo’s probably not the one who should be blamed fro this. Still, this issue may be keeping some Wii owners out there from enjoying their new consoles, so here’s what Ars Technica’s Ken Fisher suggests you do if you ever run into it:

In Wii Settings you can adjust your Internet connection and manually specify a new DNS server, if you wish. We took a different route, and changed the DNS servers on our WiFi router. From what we can tell, the Wii will use whatever is set as your Primary DNS, or DNS 1. It was enough for us to swap our primary and secondary DNS. You may have to set out in search of another DNS server to use, at least temporarily, until the DNS propagation is complete (surely by the end of this week).

I personally don’t know anybody who’s encountered this problem, but for the sake of those who are having a hard time getting their favorite virtual console games, we’re hoping that this issue gets resolved soon.

Ninty's WiFi ConnectionHere’s a question for all you lucky people out there who already have Wiis in your hands. Have you ever encountered DNS problems when trying to connect to the Wii store?

See, some guys from Ars Technica ran into a wall when they tried to do just that. They couldn’t view the EULA that’s necessary before you can buy virtual console games, and every time they tried, they just got an error 220602 message.

After calling the Nintendo help desk and getting told to a) change the WiFi router to channel 1 or 11, and b) move the Wii closer to the router (these methods didn’t work for them, but apparently it worked for some people), they finally traced the problem to a crappy DNS server.

Now, there are a lot of possible causes for the DNS propagation issues, and a lot of people have pointed out that Nintendo’s probably not the one who should be blamed fro this. Still, this issue may be keeping some Wii owners out there from enjoying their new consoles, so here’s what Ars Technica’s Ken Fisher suggests you do if you ever run into it:

In Wii Settings you can adjust your Internet connection and manually specify a new DNS server, if you wish. We took a different route, and changed the DNS servers on our WiFi router. From what we can tell, the Wii will use whatever is set as your Primary DNS, or DNS 1. It was enough for us to swap our primary and secondary DNS. You may have to set out in search of another DNS server to use, at least temporarily, until the DNS propagation is complete (surely by the end of this week).

I personally don’t know anybody who’s encountered this problem, but for the sake of those who are having a hard time getting their favorite virtual console games, we’re hoping that this issue gets resolved soon.

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