Mars Orbiter Tests

mars orbiter tests

Multi-million dollar spacecrafts need a little testing and tuning once and awhile, especially when they are planned to begin scientific exploration of Mars. That is exactly what NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is doing and the results exceed all expectations. “The test images show that both cameras will meet or exceed their performance requirements once they’re in the low-altitude science orbit,” said Michael Malin, team leader for the context camera and principal investigator for the Mars Color Imager.

NASA tested the craft’s Context Camera and Mars Color Imager and images turned out perfect. They captured images 10 times farther from the planet than its orbit altitude. The Context Camera will allow scientists to see very small surface features.
The thrusters were also tested to ensure that they will be able to safely bring the craft into Mars’ upper atmosphere.

With all the instruments in working order NASA will begin to take scientific readings, photos and other important information that will show shifts and changes in Mars’ atmosphere and ground surface. The mission is planned for next year if all the equipment continues to work at 100%.

mars orbiter tests

Multi-million dollar spacecrafts need a little testing and tuning once and awhile, especially when they are planned to begin scientific exploration of Mars. That is exactly what NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is doing and the results exceed all expectations. “The test images show that both cameras will meet or exceed their performance requirements once they’re in the low-altitude science orbit,” said Michael Malin, team leader for the context camera and principal investigator for the Mars Color Imager.

NASA tested the craft’s Context Camera and Mars Color Imager and images turned out perfect. They captured images 10 times farther from the planet than its orbit altitude. The Context Camera will allow scientists to see very small surface features.
The thrusters were also tested to ensure that they will be able to safely bring the craft into Mars’ upper atmosphere.

With all the instruments in working order NASA will begin to take scientific readings, photos and other important information that will show shifts and changes in Mars’ atmosphere and ground surface. The mission is planned for next year if all the equipment continues to work at 100%.

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