Oblivion ESRB Rating Now Mature

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) has changed the rating assigned to the game The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion from T (Teen 13+) to M (Mature 17+), following the incident of a topless game skin found within the game.

The IEMA (Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association), a non-profit retail trade organization serving merchants of videogames, was quick to react and some stores have already began asking for ID when someone wants to buy it. This is a very big thing because Oblivion was doing great in the charts. For now it’s just in the US though.

When we were notified of the game’s ratings change today, we alerted our member company representatives who communicated to their stores the change in the game’s rating. The effective change in sales policy was immediate. In fact, several major retailers changed the cash register prompt tied to the bar code of the game. Of note in this matter is the speed at which retailers reacted and parents were empowered — ultimately that is what makes any ratings system effective in the end,” says Hal Halpin, president of IEMA.

What do you think? Is this outrageous? Post below!

The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) has changed the rating assigned to the game The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion from T (Teen 13+) to M (Mature 17+), following the incident of a topless game skin found within the game.

The IEMA (Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association), a non-profit retail trade organization serving merchants of videogames, was quick to react and some stores have already began asking for ID when someone wants to buy it. This is a very big thing because Oblivion was doing great in the charts. For now it’s just in the US though.

When we were notified of the game’s ratings change today, we alerted our member company representatives who communicated to their stores the change in the game’s rating. The effective change in sales policy was immediate. In fact, several major retailers changed the cash register prompt tied to the bar code of the game. Of note in this matter is the speed at which retailers reacted and parents were empowered — ultimately that is what makes any ratings system effective in the end,” says Hal Halpin, president of IEMA.

What do you think? Is this outrageous? Post below!

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