Put your thinking caps on! Brain Training in Melbourne school

Brain Training!Who said video games were bad for you? Your mother might be trying to pry you away from your console or handheld, but things down under are quite something else. For the Greenhills Primary School at Melbourne, Australia, they’re actually encouraging their students to own up to their gaming addiction – to an extent, of course.

Their students of Grades 5 and 6 are getting their hands on the Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training game and all 150 students involved in the preliminary trial are enjoying it. James Penson wrote Nintendo a proposal of letting their students incorporate it into their curriculum since their school believes in the same concept of “working daily to improve and grow our brains and minds.” He has this to say:

These has been really great benefits. The kids were very reluctant to practise times tables, whereas now they can’t get enough of it (as part of the game). It’s really good for some of my students who are weaker in maths. I have found it has got them up to speed and has given them a lot of confidence.

Trial as it still might be, both the students and their parents will be evaluate the test run by the end of the term. Safe to say, there hasn’t been any objections on the “video game workshop” so far. Chances are, their curriculum just might get approved and fully incorporate the game into the education system.

Don’t you wish you could go back to elementary school now, huh?

Brain Training!Who said video games were bad for you? Your mother might be trying to pry you away from your console or handheld, but things down under are quite something else. For the Greenhills Primary School at Melbourne, Australia, they’re actually encouraging their students to own up to their gaming addiction – to an extent, of course.

Their students of Grades 5 and 6 are getting their hands on the Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training game and all 150 students involved in the preliminary trial are enjoying it. James Penson wrote Nintendo a proposal of letting their students incorporate it into their curriculum since their school believes in the same concept of “working daily to improve and grow our brains and minds.” He has this to say:

These has been really great benefits. The kids were very reluctant to practise times tables, whereas now they can’t get enough of it (as part of the game). It’s really good for some of my students who are weaker in maths. I have found it has got them up to speed and has given them a lot of confidence.

Trial as it still might be, both the students and their parents will be evaluate the test run by the end of the term. Safe to say, there hasn’t been any objections on the “video game workshop” so far. Chances are, their curriculum just might get approved and fully incorporate the game into the education system.

Don’t you wish you could go back to elementary school now, huh?

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