Court gives go-ahead to GTA murder lawsuit

Alabama’s Supreme Court is allowing a lawsuit filed against Sony, Take-Two, and US retailers of Grand Theft Auto to be commenced later this year or in early 2007. 18 year old Devin Moore murdered two police officers and a dispatcher in June 2003, and although he pled not guilty because of a mental defect he was convicted of the crimes and sentenced to death. Now, the victims’ families are going after those responsible for creating and distributing the game because they believed it trained Moore to become a killer. While the infamous Jack Thompson withdrew from the case after being accused for violating legal ethics, there will surely be other anti-videogames lawyers to take his place. It is possible to argue that playing GTA might have given Moore ideas about going on a killing rampage, but it’s hard to see how pressing the circle button equates to acquiring and firing a gun in real life. Ultimately, it’ll be up to Alabama’s Supreme Court to make the final decision, but you can be sure that there will be plenty of money involved in the settlement if it goes in favor of the plaintiffs.
Alabama’s Supreme Court is allowing a lawsuit filed against Sony, Take-Two, and US retailers of Grand Theft Auto to be commenced later this year or in early 2007. 18 year old Devin Moore murdered two police officers and a dispatcher in June 2003, and although he pled not guilty because of a mental defect he was convicted of the crimes and sentenced to death. Now, the victims’ families are going after those responsible for creating and distributing the game because they believed it trained Moore to become a killer. While the infamous Jack Thompson withdrew from the case after being accused for violating legal ethics, there will surely be other anti-videogames lawyers to take his place. It is possible to argue that playing GTA might have given Moore ideas about going on a killing rampage, but it’s hard to see how pressing the circle button equates to acquiring and firing a gun in real life. Ultimately, it’ll be up to Alabama’s Supreme Court to make the final decision, but you can be sure that there will be plenty of money involved in the settlement if it goes in favor of the plaintiffs.

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